About Judy Opar

Judy Opar is a mom of three boys, the youngest of them very autistic.  Judy has a BA in Psychology from The Univesity of Western Ontario  and a Master of Business Administration from Queen’s University in Kingston.  She is also a Chartered Accountant.  Judy articled for the CA designation at Ernst & Young, and subsequently spend almost 10 years in finance at Nortel Networks, where she held a variety of positions in statutory accounting, specialized accounting, manufacturing and cost accouting, and general ledger administration.  She then left the world of business to raise her family. 

While working in her most important position (MOM) Judy continued to be active as a volunteer in the arts. Volunteer work eventually led to paid work, and a keen interest in the world of charities and non-profit organizations.
Judy continues to provide bookkeeping services to small charities and NPOs that seek to make the world a better place through her business Bee in Balance Bookkeeping.

Judy enjoys writing about her extraordinary experiences with autism. When not writing or bookkeeping, or being mom, she makes candles, knits for those in need, takes care of flowers and a vegetable garden, feeds the birds and spends as much time as possible outdoors, especially enjoying hikes on the Bruce Trail.

Mom with N at Special Olympics

Mom with N at Special Olympics

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7 Responses to About Judy Opar

  1. Brian Danilko says:

    Hi Judy

    Your intro to your blog makes total sense — I am so unable to understand your trials, your daily life, your anything. But I did want to say how amazed and proud of you that I am. You write with so much humour and love that it is inspiring to read.

    Found you and the blog by accident around Christmas14 (Facebook strikes!) — I don’t want to intrude, just wanted to wish you and your family well. Reading your stories really affected me – I had to wait a bit (ok, a year) before I could write, and it’s still over the top 🙂

    Would like to add a witty and mood lightening anecdote here, but instead I’ll just sign off with good wishes — hope that my and my family’s good wishes find you and yours in a good place.

    Happy Christmas,
    Brian

    • Hi Brian – nice to hear from you and thanks for reaching out! Thank you also for reading my blog and for your kind words. Yes it has been quite a journey and still, it goes on. I am always amazed when my stories reach somebody unexpected and special. Writing for me is a kind of catharsis. It is not about going viral – in some ways I fear that. I do not want Children’s Aid knocking at my door (but if they do, I am prepared!). At the same time I think that there needs to be a greater understanding, particularly by those in a position to effect change, that some autistic kids are NOT going to “get better” with “integration”, the current political philosophy. They NEED their own programs that they can succeed at. Unfortunately I suspect that this audience will not read my blog because they would prefer to ignore this problem. Now I think I need to add something witty and mood lightening – hmm – perhaps I will simply echo warm Christmas wishes to you and your family! Cheers!

      • bdanilko says:

        I applaud your desire to change the status quo — we need more people
        that take their hard won knowledge and intelligently apply it. And fight
        for their government to step up too. Funny, given the current climate,
        I need to add – non-violently fight.

        Your blog doesn’t come across as an attempt to go viral at all. Instead
        it reads like a very personal account which, I would think, provides
        insight and support to families in similar circumstances. And it should
        be a useful account for professionals working with special needs kids and
        adults too — your experiences, and thoughts, formed over years should be
        listened to.

        I’m really glad that writing helps you too. I think what floored me
        about your writing was the difficulties – both for your son, and for you
        and your family, and your methods of coping with them. If writing helps
        you, it definitely helps other families, so we’ve got a win-win situation.

        Anyway, rambling again. I’ve never learned how to write in social media
        forums — I’ve always just written person to person. Even though I work
        in computers, I only went on FB when my daughter was overseas at uni
        for a year, and have since dropped out of it. I see that it can be very
        good (like your blog) but I’ve seen some negative examples too. I’m mainly
        stuck in email with google talk for my daughter (she’s living OS again).

        How right I am — I found that replying to the email notification doesn’t work — it’s been sitting somewhere in the ether for a couple of days. Probably best if you send me an email if you would like to talk, that I know how to do. Wow less then 10 days until Christmas — hope that you guys have lots of joyous moments. And hope to hear from you when you have time. Take care.

      • bdanilko says:

        I applaud your desire to change the status quo — we need more people
        that take their hard won knowledge and intelligently apply it. And fight
        for their government to step up too. Funny, given the current climate,
        I need to add – non-violently fight.

        Your blog doesn’t come across as an attempt to go viral at all. Instead
        it reads like a very personal account which, I would think, provides
        insight and support to families in similar circumstances. And it should
        be a useful account for professionals working with special needs kids and
        adults too — your experiences, and thoughts, formed over years should be
        listened to.

        I’m really glad that writing helps you too. I think what floored me
        about your writing was the difficulties – both for your son, and for you
        and your family, and your methods of coping with them. If writing helps
        you, it definitely helps other families, so we’ve got a win-win situation.

        Anyway, rambling again. I’ve never learned how to write in social media
        forums — I’ve always just written person to person. Even though I work
        in computers, I only went on FB when my daughter was overseas at uni
        for a year, and have since dropped out of it. I see that it can be very
        good (like your blog) but I’ve seen some negative examples too. I’m mainly
        stuck in email with google talk for my daughter (she’s living OS again).

        Case in point — I responded to the notification email and it got stuck in the ether. Probably best if you want to talk, and have the time, to email me — that I know how to do. Wow — 10 days until Christmas. Hope that you guys have lots of joyous moments and hope to hear from you when you have time. Take care.

  2. jofox2108 says:

    Just wanted to let you know that in your post ‘Autism home for the holidays’ in the paragraph which starts ‘One child in particular took trampoline take-over it to another level. ‘ you’ve got ‘N’s name written out. Since you’re using his initial my guess is that you’re doing this to protect his identity so I thougt I’d drop you a note to let you know. Hope this helps. All the best!

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